Human Trafficking Search Aims to Increase Public Awareness and Facilitate the Elimination of Human Trafficking World Wide.

labor exploitation in private prisons

Action Required: Recommendations for Stakeholders Against Labor Exploitation in Private Prisons

Human Trafficking Search recently published a study which examines the use of labor in private prisons, finding that private prisons are not required to pay inmates a fair wage for the work they do, despite being able to make a profit. This is the third in a blog series to summarize the research.

What are you interested in learning?

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery, in which human beings are controlled and exploited for profit. Perpetrators use force, fraud, or coercion to manipulate and establish control over individuals.

Within the debate of penal labor, one commonly ignored aspect is the use of labor in contract facilities, also known as private prisons. Private prisons account for 16 percent of federal prisons, eleven percent of federal inmates respectively. Given the corporate nature of private prisons, questions arise regarding whether penal labor in private facilities is exploitative. This study examines the use of penal labor for institutional maintenance by federally contracted private facilities. Findings indicate that penal labor in contracted facilities operates in a similar fashion to labor in public prisons. The author argues that the nature of privatization and...

This study develops a robust set of criteria to evaluate states on their anti -trafficking protections for youth within the foster care system. Each of the fifty U.S. states (and the District of Columbia) is given a score based on their success in meeting the requirements presented in the criteria, all of which play a crucial role in preventing children from being trafficked from the foster care system. By grading the states on a detailed 32 -point scale, this study highlights the areas where states have been successful in deterring trafficking from foster care, and more importantly where states...

Human Trafficking Search recently published a study which examines the use of labor in private prisons, finding that private prisons are not required to pay inmates a fair wage for the work they do, despite being able to make a profit. This is the first in a blog series to summarize the research.

Given the underground nature of trafficking, the consequences of trafficking are hidden and difficult to see. Trafficked persons often have limited access to basic necessities such as safety, food, sleep, hygiene, and medical care.

The Mara Salvatrucha, better known by their acronym MS-13, is one of the largest and most violent transnational criminal organizations in the world. Their motto is “Kill, Rape, Control.”9 Since the 1980s, MS-13 members have typically engaged in a wide range of violent and criminal activity including, “drug distribution, murder, rape, prostitution, robbery, home invasions, immigration offenses, kidnapping, carjacking/auto thefts, and vandalism.”10 More recently there has been a rise in MS-13 engaging in various forms of human trafficking. This paper seeks to explore the connection between the MS-13 and human...

The majority of candy to be handed out this year is chocolate. But did you know that despite generating over $110 billion a year, the chocolate industry has a century-long history of forced and child labor?

Human Trafficking most often occurs in plain sight, contrary to the common conception. Being aware of human trafficking indicators is the first step in making a difference in the lives of those who may be entrapped.

A glossary of terms related to human trafficking and modern-day slavery and their definitions. Compiled by Human Trafficking...

Various forms of trafficking exist around the world, including forced labor, sex trafficking, child labor, commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), and child soldiers.

This book uses fictional case vignettes  based on true stories and on real dilemmas faced in the field. They highlight the obstacles to successfully identifying victims and getting to the truth in interviews. They illustrate the hidden reasons many victims stay in abusive situations, though their chains might not be tangible or easily understood by an outsider. The case studies explore the pitfalls and challenges to designing and implementing culturally competent interventions that do not re-victimize or re-traumatize survivors. They grapple with the additional challenges of working through an interpreter and collaborating effectively across sectors to prosecute traffickers and...