Human Trafficking Search seeks to raise awarenessprevent, and help facilitate the elimination of human trafficking worldwide.

Trafficking in Tribal Nations: the impact of sex trafficking on Native Americans

January 22, 2018 In the United States, January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. In support of this occasion, the Human Trafficking Search weekly blog seeks to examine areas of the human trafficking crisis that do not typically make the...

What are you interested in learning?

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery, in which human beings are controlled and exploited for profit. Perpetrators use force, fraud, or coercion to manipulate and establish control over individuals.

Human and sex trafficking is a crime that affects nearly every community across our nation; it is an insidious threat that has proven difficult to track and quantify, and exceedingly hard to dismantle. While there is a perception that human trafficking involves international criminals targeting victims living in the developing world, it is commonplace here in the US and in Indian Country. We can not ignore the networks, pipelines, the victims, or the systems that enable human trafficking. In this Tribal Insights Brief, the NCAI Policy Research Center paints a portrait of human trafficking in American Indian and Alaska...

It is undeniable that human trafficking is a global enterprise that transcends all racial and geographic boundaries. “Human trafficking is the second largest criminal industry in the world and it is easily the fastest growing.” While much of the focus on human trafficking centers on its global effect, little attention is given to the rampant issues women on our own soil face. The breadth and regularity of human trafficking in the United States cannot be overstated, and most people fail to recognize its presence and complexity. Indeed, human trafficking is a troubling national issue, but its impact on Native...

Given the underground nature of trafficking, the consequences of trafficking are hidden and difficult to see. Trafficked persons often have limited access to basic necessities such as safety, food, sleep, hygiene, and medical care.

Of the 40 million people trapped in modern slavery today, 70 percent of them are women and girls. Every day across the globe, millions of women and girls are used, controlled and exploited for commercial or personal gain. They are trafficked into the sex industry, kept in servitude as domestic workers in private homes, forced to work in exploitative conditions in factories and bonded into agricultural labour. They suffer terrible violence and are denied their basic rights and freedoms. The Freedom Fund’s report, “Her freedom, her voice: Insights from the Freedom Fund’s work with women and girls,” draws on insights...

Human Trafficking most often occurs in plain sight, contrary to the common conception. Being aware of human trafficking indicators is the first step in making a difference in the lives of those who may be entrapped.

Commonly called massage parlors, illicit massage businesses (IMBs) that front for commercial sex operations have been ubiquitous in the American landscape for decades. While some keep a low profile, many others blatantly advertise “Asian gals,” or bear sexualized names like “Good Girl Spa.” In 2017, Polaris analyzed more than 32,000 cases of human trafficking from the National Human Trafficking Hotline (NHTH) and developed a classification system that identifies 25 distinct types of human trafficking in the United States. By mapping and cross referencing numerous publicly available datasets, Polaris found more than 9,000 illicit massage businesses operating in America. They exist in...

Various forms of trafficking exist around the world, including forced labor, sex trafficking, child labor, commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), and child soldiers.

This article details the recent proliferation of state-level  child sex trafficking legislation in the U.S. It first focuses on the history of CSEC (commercially sexually exploited children) legislation in the United States by contextualizing the history of state anti-trafficking laws within the larger anti-trafficking policy framework of federal U.S. statutes and United Nations’ (U.N.) protocols. The second and third sections address the variables, statistical model, and results of our data analysis. The fourth section discusses the implications of these findings. The article concludes with practical considerations for future CSEC legislative efforts on the state...